Category Archives: Interviews

Designing Business Models for Impact

MatthewManos_640x480

An interview with verynice founder Matthew Manos on his journey in impact design, a new consultancy, and the importance of thinking business model first.

An exciting new design consultancy just launched–but it’s not offering your typical architectural, communication, web, industrial, or interior design services. Instead, the 2-month-old firm Models of Impact designs business models for nonprofits, startups, and social entrepreneurs.

Began as a research project at the communications and strategy firm verynice, Models of Impact evolved in two years from a collection of social impact business models, to a free interactive site, to now a consultancy offering one-on-one workshops for those seeking to create sustainable organizations.Continue Reading

Sharing More about Social Impact Design Metrics on GOOD FORM!

goodform!

The new podcast GOOD FORM! has recently hit the internet airwaves and I was lucky enough to sit down with the hosts for their second episode to share my current endeavors with social impact design and measurement.

Started by young architects Bryan Mock and Brandon Wlosinski of The Iterative, the podcast is aimed at giving an inside view of how designers and studios are doing great work. As a “studio of one” with a network of collaborators, I spoke about my current pursuits with PublicInterestDesign.org, the Autodesk Foundation, AzuKo, and a forthcoming research project into impact measurement for design along with my journey into this work.

I hope you enjoy the interview and make sure to check out the other interviews with Audrey Galo of Architecture for Humanity and Ced Funches.

Building Dignity in War-Torn Sudan: Part 4

This is the  final post of a four-part installment of my article on Studio TAMassociati and their Pediatric Center in Port Sudan for the new PUBLIC Journal, the first publication dedicated solely to public interest design and architecture. Read the first part on the studio here, the second part on the design of the building here, and the third part on the systems design here.

In the final part, tamassociati shares what’s up next for the studio in the years ahead.

A FUTURE WITH LOW COST, HIGH VALUE DESIGN

salam_center_sudan_00

Since the completion of the Pediatric Center, tamassociati’s methodologies and projects are receiving increased recognition among the international design community, most recently being bestowed with an Aga Khan Award for Architecture and a Curry Stone Design Prize in 2013. With the award prize money, the studio, which operates as a “research team,” is focusing their efforts for 2014 around the theme “Low Cost, High Value.”Continue Reading

Building Dignity in War-Torn Sudan: Part 3

This is the third of a four-part installment of my article on Studio TAMassociati and their Pediatric Center in Port Sudan for the new PUBLIC Journal, the first publication dedicated solely to public interest design and architecture. Read the first part on the studio here and the second part on the design of the building here.

In this post, we look at the low-cost, low-maintenance mechanical and plumbing systems designed to maximize the efficiency of the building in the harsh desert climate. 

DESIGNING FOR EFFICIENCY & LONGEVITY

A 17

Because the site is in an arid climate zone where temperatures often exceed 120°F, the grassy play areas and garden surrounding the hospital are understandably out of the ordinary and require constant irrigation. The architects worked with engineers from Climosfera to devise a wastewater treatment system to irrigate the greenery surrounding the site. “That is the only green in all of Sudan because of the filtration system with wastewater,” said Pantaleo. “This has become a central part of the [greater city] area where people can meet and also because at night it’s the only place where people can get light.”Continue Reading

Building Dignity in War-Torn Sudan: Part 2

This is the second of a four-part installment of my article on Studio TAMassociati and their Pediatric Center in Port Sudan for the new PUBLIC Journal, the first publication dedicated solely to public interest design and architecture. Read the first part on the studio here.

In this post, we discover how the history, culture, and architecture of the evoloving Port Sudan inspired the design of the new Pediatric Center for Emergency. Plus a partnership with an artist brings a unique perspective to the project. 

A PLACE FOR HEALING IN A BUSTLING PORT CITY

020

tamassociati’s most recently completed healthcare facility continues to fulfill Emergency’s “outrageously beautiful” design mandate. Adopting typical Arab building principles and forms observed throughout Sudan, the gleaming white Pediatric Center, which provides free healthcare to children under 14 years of age, wraps around a central garden, providing a place of peace and rest to a rapidly emerging refugee neighborhood in Port Sudan.Continue Reading